Monthly Archives: September 2012

Ryanair delay leaves passengers sweating

Ryanair, the World’s Most Hated Airline, kept passengers on board a plane for two hours in temperatures of 38 degrees due to a delay and the airline not activating cooling systems, according to a story on http://www.lavanguardia.com

The passengers, some of whom look like they are either collapsing, or about to, are caught on this film shot by one of them. Not very nice at all by the looks of it. One wonders why Ryanair are so intent on treating passengers so badly. Turn on the air-con! There is also the presumption that water was not handed out unless paid for at £5 per bottle.

 

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Ryanair flight infested with ticks – passengers charged ‘bite fee’

Ryanair, the World’s Most Hated Airline, are facing legal action by Italian consumer watchdog Codacons after passengers travelling from Denmark to Rome on Thursday reported receiving insect bites during their flight.

In a statement the organisation said it would be filing a complaint with the Rome prosecutor’s office and asking for compensation on behalf of the travellers.

Passengers had to receive medical treatment on arriving in the capital as a result of soreness and itching caused by the bites, thought to be the work of ticks. The plane was subsequently grounded and disinfested before resuming service on Friday morning.

Ryanair, keen to make a quick buck, are retrospectively charging passengers credit cards with a £5 tick bite surcharge.  Blood sucking bastards.

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Ryanair incident leaves 16 injured in Gran Canaria to Madrid flight

Ryanair, the World’s Most Hated Airline, suffered a cabin depressurization on Flight FR2011 (Madrid-Gran Canaria) this week forcing the flight to make an emergency landing at Barajas airport shortly after takeoff.

The pilots carried out emergency procedures, oxygen masks were deployed and they began a controlled descent of the aircraft to the appropriate height.

The plane returned to Madrid “immediately” and landed normally at 8.25 hours disembarking passengers “safely”.

After the incident, sixteen passengers were treated by medical services.vFourteen of them were discharged and two were taken to a hospital but were discharged hours later.

The full story is available, translated by Google here: http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.farodevigo.es%2Fespana%2F2012%2F09%2F08%2Fnuevo-incidente-avion-ryanair-deja-16-heridos-vuelo-madrid-gran-canaria%2F681324.html%3Futm_medium%3Drss&act=url

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Ryanair emergency descent ‘forced by maintenance errors’

A jet operated by Ryanair, the World’s Most Hated Airline, forced to make an emergency 21,000ft descent in April this year, was not properly maintained, a report says.

Thirteen people were hurt when the captain of the Ryanair service was forced to make the manoeuvre when the aircraft lost cabin pressure.

Solicitors for some passengers on the Milan-to-East Midlands flight on 4 April said they had “serious concerns” over pressure controller failures.

Ryanair said it would follow any recommendations in the final report.

The flight from Milan Bergamo airport had 134 passengers on board.

The crew took the plane from 31,000ft to 10,000ft in five minutes to make sure the passengers could breathe and then diverted to Frankfurt-Hahn airport.

The interim report by the German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation found that when the main pressure controller failed, its back up also failed because it had been incorrectly installed.

It also highlighted possible changes in how aircraft maker Boeing could make the controller easier to fit.

Nottingham couple Melvin and Jacqueline Frater, who were on board, said: “It was as bad as you would expect – and worse. You just can’t believe it is happening.

“You can’t afford to make those sort of mistakes when so many lives depend on the safety of the aircraft.”

Solicitors Irwin Mitchell said: “While it is welcome that the causes of this incident have been identified in the interim report, a fault with one pressure controller and a badly designed shipping plug on the other gives rise to serious concerns.”

A Ryanair spokesman said: “Ryanair notes the German Authority interim report into an aircraft depressurisation in April 2012.

“The German report suggests that Boeing redesigns a ‘black shipping plug’ to make it more ‘clearly visible’ for maintenance staff, and Ryanair will follow any recommendations made by the final report.”

A final report on the incident is due to be published at a future date and its findings are subject to possible alteration.

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